Gay Pride - LGBTQIA Healthcare Guild

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About Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Pride Month


Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride Month (LGBT Pride Month) is currently celebrated each year in the month of June to honor the 1969 Stonewall riots in Manhattan. The Stonewall riots were a tipping point for the Gay Liberation Movement in the United States. In the United States the last Sunday in June was initially celebrated as “Gay Pride Day,” but the actual day was flexible. In major cities across the nation the “day” soon grew to encompass a month-long series of events. Today, celebrations include pride parades, picnics, parties, workshops, symposia and concerts, and LGBT Pride Month events attract millions of participants around the world. Memorials are held during this month for those members of the community who have been lost to hate crimes or HIV/AIDS. The purpose of the commemorative month is to recognize the impact that lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals have had on history locally, nationally, and internationally. ....


Center Link - Online Directory of LGBTQIA Community Centers


Most Community Centers for sexual and gender minorities have information about local and statewide pride festivals/events.  Click on the map to locate a center nearest you.  CenterLink organization plays an important role in supporting the growth of LGBT centers across the country and addressing the challenges they face, by helping them to improve their organizational and service delivery capacity and increase access to public resources....
 

San Francisco Gay Pride - World Leading Pride Movement


A world leader in the Pride movement, SF Pride is also a grant-giving organization through our Community Partners Program. Since 1997, SF Pride has granted over $2.1 million dollars from proceeds of the Pride Celebration and Parade to local non-profit LGBT organizations and those organizations working on issues related to HIV/AIDS, cancer, homelessness, and animal welfare....


Gay Pride in New York City - Modern Gay Rights Movement


Today as the struggle for gay rights continues Heritage of Pride hosts New York City’s Pride events in commemoration of the Stonewall Riots of 1969, the beginning of the modern Gay Rights movement....


InterPride - International Pride Organization


InterPride is the international organization that ties Pride together globally. Members of our organization are dedicated volunteers who organize and work to put on Pride events all over the world. InterPride’s Vision is a world where there is full cultural, social and legal equality for all.  InterPride’s Mission is to increase the capacity of our network of LGBTI Pride organizations around the world to raise awareness of cultural, social and legal inequality, and to effect positive change through education, collaboration, advocacy and outreach...
 

History of the Rainbow Flag - Gay Pride New Orleans


The Rainbow Flag made its first appearance in the San Francisco Gay and Lesbian Freedom Day Parade in 1978.  Its symbolism was borrowed from the hippie and black civil rights movements.  Artist Gilbert Baker from San Francisco, our own gay Betsy Ross, created the flag as a symbol that could be used year after year.


Along with about 30 volunteers, two gigantic prototype of the flag were hand-stitched and hand-dyed.  The original flag had eight stripes, with each color representing a particular component of the gay community:  hot pink for sex, red for life, orange for healing, yellow for sun, green for nature, turquoise for the arts, indigo for harmony, and violet for spirit.


The following year, as a result of extraordinary demand for the flag, Baker contacted San Francisco Paramount Flag Company to inquire about the possibility of mass-producing his flag for use in the 1979 parade.  He was surprised to learn that due to production issues and the fact that hot pink was not a readily available commercial color, his original eight colors could not be used.  The fact is that he had hand-dyed the original colors.  Hot pink was removed from the palette and the flag was reduced to seven stripes, with indigo being replaced by royal blue....

 
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